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Showing posts with the label Presbyterianism

Remembering Founding Father Reverend John Witherspoon (1723 - 1794)

On this Thanksgiving Eve, I am delighted to share this tribute to Rev. John Witherspoon, a founding father and dedicated Christian, featured at Breakpoint: In Declaration of Independence by John Trumbull (1818), Witherspoon is the second seated figure from the (viewer's) right among those shown in the background facing the large table. (Public Domain/ Wikipedia ) The Legacy of John Witherspoon The groundwork of a lesser-known founder who shaped the early years of the Repu blic. The month of November marks the death of John Witherspoon, one of the most important and most underrated of the American founding fathers. Born in Scotland in 1723, Witherspoon received a Master of Arts at age 16 from the University of Edinburgh, where he would continue his studies in divinity. In 1745, he became an evangelical minister in the Church of Scotland. Witherspoon was no fan of the monarchy and was imprisoned the following year for opposing the royalist Jacobite uprising, an experience that da

Christian Citizenship Bible Study

Sadly, the acknowledgment of our Lord and Savior as Sovereign over our (and all) nations was omitted from our founding document, the Constitution. I plan to take a closer look at this omission and the movement for a Christian Amendment in a future post; but for now I want to share a Christian Citizenship Bible Study with you. This material was taught to me by my Reformed Presbyterian pastor approximately 20 years ago. Please be blessed as you study it with Bible in hand. Understanding Biblical Doctrine, Lesson XVI, “Christian Citizenship” Romans 13:1 “Let every soul be subject unto the higher powers. For there is no power but of God: the powers that be are ordained of God.” I. The Biblical View of Government A. Man’s need for civil government stems from the fact that God created him with the ability to live in an orderly society. (Genesis 1:28 — And God blessed them, and God said unto them, Be fruitful, and multiply, and replenish the earth, and subdue it: and have dominion over the

Independence Day Reflection: The Presbyterian Influence for Independence

 Nathan Eshelman, a pastor in the Reformed Presbyterian Church of North America   has been so kind as to remind us of the noble Presbyterian history of our great nation in his blog post at Gentle Reformation . As you celebrate Independence Day in America, please contemplate this part of our Christian heritage and please give thanks to God for the freedoms and religious liberty (while not perfect) we still enjoy today. Enjoy Your Freedom? Thank a Presbyterian. Published July 2, 2019 As those of us in the United States this week celebrate freedom from British governance, consider the many ways that Presbyterianism influenced the decision to enter a war for independence and take up arms against a magistrate: Only a Presbyterian understanding of Romans 13 would allow us to enter a war. The Bible calls for submission to magistrates, but Presbyterians understood the nuances that allowed for rebellion against tyranny. (See James M. Wilson's Establishment and Limits of Civil Goverment for

Taking a Closer Look at Mecklenburg, NC: Rev. Hezekiah James Balch

"There can be no freedom without order! Oh for the order which is in Christ, that we might have that freedom which is in him also!"   ~Motto of Rev. Hezekiah James Balch  (Source:  Rev Hezekiah James Balch (1745-1776) - Find a Grave Memorial ) I found this account of Rev. Hezekiah James Balch by David T. Myers posted at This Day in Presbyterian History.   It's important for us to remember men like Rev. Balch and how Providence used them at such an important, foundational time in American history, which is really His-Story.  May the Lord bless you as you read this man's story and may his name be honored and remembered among God's people, amen.  - Mercy Adams Unwavering Devotion to Christ and Country by David T. Myers Here and there in these posts, you have read about Presbyterian clergy who were instrumental in preparing and molding the popular minds of Americans for the great struggle of the American Revolution. From both pulpit and battle field worship service,